Love Unconditionally

Thoughts from the heart….

The idea of unconditional love is difficult for some people to grasp. I understand it because I understand God’s love for me, but my understanding of unconditional love doesn’t make it any easier for me to show it. I struggle to love without expectation.

Some people, like my husband, have a gift for loving unconditionally. I sometimes forget that my wealth of love is abundant and self-replenishing. My mind prevents me from sharing what my heart wants to give.

In a transactional world, I feel blessed to have an extension of God’s love in my own home. Today, let us try to remember that LOVE should always be given freely.

Luv&Hugs,

*Kristine*

USCCB Calls for Stand Against Racism

When I first watched the video of George Floyd’s death, I was physically sickened. I cried as the life poured out of him, breath by breath. I didn’t know his criminal history. I didn’t even know why he was under the police officer’s knee. The only thing I knew, in my heart, was that this human being was having his life unjustly snuffed out before my very eyes like an animal and not a child of God by someone charged to protect and serve. George’s cry for his mother reverberated in my soul.

As a mother, I was angry. Instantly.

I took to my social media with a fury. I lashed out at the white community. It was loud and vengeful. Then, I lay silent for days, giving way to those who deserve more than I to be heard.

Looking back now, those first words written were not Christian. Although my post contained phrases like “as God intended” and “treat our neighbors as ourselves,” the rest of the mini-tirade was less than honorable. Still, it gave me needed insight into the rage that erupted from the black community. The actions of some were less than honorable–many more have died in the ensuing riots–but their anger is more than justifiable. It was heartening to see the world react with similar, yet peaceful outrage in support.

Today, I came across a YouTube video that contains a much better message than I could hope to put together. Since I’m still heartbroken and at a loss for the right words, I wanted to share it with all of you. Perhaps, it can bring you a bit of peace.

The Catholic Church has taken a clear stance on the unfolding events surrounding the death of George Floyd, and recognizes the pattern in American society at large. This message from the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops is beautiful, powerful, and clear.

I am proud to be Catholic. I stand with my church. I stand against racism.

Be the Change.

Kristine


If you’re interested to watch Pope Francis’ calming and heart-felt reaction to the death of George Floyd, the civil unrest in the U.S., and the evil of racism: watch this video from the Catholic News Service.

Women’s Unique Stress Response: Key to Change

You have probably heard of the survival instinct labeled “Fight-or-Flight.” It’s a natural, biological response for humans and animals in the face of danger. What if I told you, however, that women also have another innate biological response to danger that is not so well known?

According to a study from the University of California, Los Angeles, led by Shelley E. Taylor and published in the Psychological Review, women respond much differently than men in high-stress situations (411). This uniquely feminine response may explain a lot of our daily dealings with our children and others, and it is what Mothering Humanity believes positions women as the perfect change-makers in an imperfect world.

Our natural response, as women, to stressful situations is not to put up our dukes or run away scared. Women are not initially concerned with self-preservation. This may not be a surprise to many of you. So what is our response? What does our biology tell us to do?

Taylor and her colleagues say, women “Tend-and-Befriend.” (Click the link to see the full scholarly article, courtesy of Harvard University’s online archives.)

At first glance, you might notice the word ‘and’ in our natural response versus the ‘or’ in fight-or-flight. As women, our response to stress is two-fold.

Not only does our mothering instinct kick in and we tend to those around us, but we seek to befriend in an effort to reduce risk.

Instead of battle, women look to peace. Instead of creating enemies and opposite sides, women seek alliances and nurture interconnectedness. Pointing to this distinct biological difference as part of the backbone of Mothering Humanity may seem divisive or counterintuitive (women vs. men)—the exact opposite of tend-and-befriend—but I whole-heartedly believe in you.

As the founder of Mothering Humanity, I believe women can bring out the best in all those around us and raise the next generation of peacemakers. This is an opportunity to embrace our biological difference and harness it to build a better tomorrow.

In addition to creating a beautiful and powerful web of women alliances, let us extend our tending and befriending tendencies to our partners, co-workers, community members, and online connections. Together, we can become the change!

In the true spirit of tending, I will continue to post helpful content here at Mothering Humanity, including more on this very important study, where I will break down both aspects of this theory and discuss how we can and are putting it to work in the world.

I hope that befriending all of you will be a natural result of our time spent together here and on Facebook, cultivating relationships and creating change within our own spheres of influence.

If you can’t wait to continue this discussion with Mothering Humanity and your curiosity is begging you to dive deeper into this topic right this instant, here are some helpful links: